Poison Bottle Block of the Month: Block Nine

This month’s two bottles offer a nice variety of size and color. Grab the patterns here!

 

Bluetop Flagon and Gold Coffin

Bluetop Flagon and Gold Coffin

The large blue bottle is referred to as a “bluetop flagon.” The small gold bottle is a very interesting coffin-shaped bottle that was manufactured in many colors. Read more about the history of the bottles here.

My guest artist for the month is Diane Doran. You can see her variation here. My variations can be found here.

Each bottle has an added level of difficulty as well.  The blue flagon can be made in three separate applique pieces. The coffin bottle has an added skull and crossbones image on the front. I added some metal brads along the edges to simulate the original bumps on the bottle. The look like little coffin nails. It’s a fun optional embellishment.

block after completing the applique

block after completing the applique

Blue Flagon detailed instructions

When you trace the parts of the blue flagon, trace an extra quarter inch at the top of the light (bottom) section. Trace the blue section as it appears on the pattern. Trace the “poison” label piece as a separate piece of fusible as well.

Fuse each piece of fusible to fabric. After the shapes are cut out, place the light colored bottom piece first. Place the blue top piece next. Place and fuse the label last.

I added the text “POISON” with a Tsukineko fabric marker.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gold Coffin detailed instructions

Before fusing the gold bottle to your background fabric, lightly trace the skull and crossbones design from your pattern, using a pencil. Mark brad placement at this point as well. A lightbox or holding it up to a bright window helps with the tracing.

After fusing the bottle shape in place, add dimensional details with fabric markers, paint or Derwent Inktense pencils as desired.

After the block is thoroughly dry, you can add brads if you want. I used a large chenille needle to make a hole where I had previously marked. You can use a sharp pencil, an awl, or a stiletto to make your hole. It’s better to err on the small side. You can always embiggen it later.  Insert both arms of the brad through the hole, and open the arms on the back of the block.

Be very careful when you quilt this later! Don’t run over the brads accidentally. If you do, don’t blame me!

open arms of brad to the back

open arms of brad to the back

making a hole for the brad

making a hole for the brad

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